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  • kim

    brilliant, wish i had seen this before winter started.

  • http://www.caseyoc.info Casey

    Okay, coupla things. I just gave this a try and will preface this by saying that I am not a builder, not a craftsman, not even remotely good at measuring things. So I took my project list in to Lowe’s and got everything I needed, came home and got started and then said, “Wha???” First, if you’re working with a 20″ x 30″ piece of foam, and your Plexiglass is 24″ x 36″, you’ve got a heckuva big overlap on the Plexiglass. Also, I would have failed high school geometry without the egghead sitting next to me in class, but I don’t think you can build the frame parts out of the second sheet of 20″ x 30″ foam board. I couldn’t, anyway. Luckily, my piece of foam board was 36″ x 60″ and I had plenty to work with.

    Just a heads-up for others. You might be able to figure it out, but as a beginner DIY-er, the directions left a lot to be desired.

  • http://uboslav.com Nick

    Wow, thanks for this information. Its always good to see alternatives to saving heat. I imagine one could make it a little bigger if they had the window space?

  • greener

    For all your time and effort you may want to consider a visit to solarwindowhearters.com. They have a set of plans for a solar window heater which I purchased. I ended up building six units and my project gives me 3,880 BTUs.

  • Shanna

    I have a question. Could you use old glass windows instead of plexiglass? We have a bunch of the old storm windows left from when the previous owners replaced a couple of the windows in our house. So if I could use glass versus plexi, obviously with a baby and 3 cats I would need to secure the whole thing to the window that I put it in, but that would save me a bit, plexi is not cheap where I live.

  • peter

    on a sunny day the room temperature may rise with this thing. but it won’t save you any money, because the energy of the sunlight otherwise would heat your furniture and stuff and would emit the energy into the rooms air very slowly when the temperature is falling at night-time.. what i understand from physics this thing as at best a very small effect in very sunny winters. to save $45 a month your house must be extremely energy unefficient and you better invest the money into double-glazed windows ;-) cheers, peter

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  • Ron

    Question: Why use pennies?
    I’m sure the quick answer is that copper conducts (and holds) the heat from the sun; but pennies have almost no copper in them anymore, combined with the fact that they are also painted.
    Couldn’t (shouldn’t) you use another metal instead? What about using copper pipes (one inch) and paint those black. Then attach them at the ends to a sealed section on the top and bottom for intake and output, so that the heated section is isolated and builds up more heat.
    I know it would cost a little more, but wouldn’t the box be much more effective?
    Just a thought (or two). :o )
    Ron

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    For all your time and effort you may want to consider a visit to solarwindowhearters.com. They have a set of plans for a solar window heater which I purchased. I ended up building six units and my project gives me 3,880 BTUs.

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